Category Archives: Sleep Disorders

Sleep Texting: New Sleep Disorder on the Increase

sleep texting

In today’s digital world, sleepwalking and sleep talking are old news. Today, a new disorder, called sleep texting, is on the rise. Medical experts believe there are roughly 70 sleep disorders, and sleep texting is one of the newest on the list.

Sleep Disorders and Their Treatments on the Rise

rising bar graph

The number of sleep disorder diagnoses worldwide is discouraging enough in its own right. However, the really alarming information is the rise in number of sleep disorders diagnosed among children and teens. The problem is, it isn’t just children. Sleep disorders among women are also on the rise, according to Living Healthy News, as are emergency room visits related to prescribed sleep medications such as Ambien.

Snoring: Causes and Cures

 

snoring and sleep apnea

Medical Disclaimer: No claims are made for cures of any type within the following blog post. Check with your physician before following any regimen for snoring or any other medical issues you may be facing.

Snoring is a common phenomenon, with a recent survey estimating that approximately 50% of the population of the United States snore at some time or other during their life. Snoring can affect people of all ages, including children, although it is more common in people who are between the ages of 40 and 60. Twice as many men snore than women.

Is ADHD a Sleeping Disorder in Disguise?

 

boy with adhd

A recent editorial published in the New York Times from Vatsal G. Thakkar, professor of psychiatry at N.Y.U. School of Medicine, discusses his beliefs that many cases of diagnosed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, are in reality sleep disorders in camouflage.

Hypersomnia

exhausted man

Excessive sleepiness, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is the hallmark sign of hypersomnia. Hypersomnia can also be characterized by prolonged sleep at night. Up to 40 percent of people experience symptoms of hypersomnia at one time or the other, reports WebMd. Some people inflicted with this sleep disorder have trouble functioning at work and school and interacting with family, friends, and in other social situations.

How to Sleep Better with Spring Allergies

woman with hay fever

For many people, spring is a welcome sight after a cold and dreary winter. For allergy sufferers though, the sight of blooming flowers, budding trees, and green grass is greeted with less of a warm-and-fuzzy welcome. The sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, coughing, congestion, sinus pressure, itchy and watery eyes, and even difficulty sleeping are all signs that it’s allergies are in full bloom.

How Does Alcohol Affect Sleep?

no sign alcoholic drink

Excessive alcohol use can wreak havoc on your sleeping patterns for a number of reasons. While some people may believe that alcohol aids in being able to sleep, it actually creates the opposite effect and can seriously disturb your sleeping patterns.

Periodic Limb Movement Disorder

legs

If your bed looks like a war zone when you wake up, then you may be suffering from the sleep-related parasomnia disorder known as Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, or PLMD. Another clue of the disorder is thread bare spots on your bedsheets in the area that you normally position your feet. While anyone can suffer from the disorder, it is more common in middle- and older-aged people.

Confusional Arousals

confused

Not being fully asleep nor fully awake, confusional arousals cause their subject to be dazed and confused during periods of transitions from sleep, usually upon waking. Along with sleepwalking and night terrors, confusional arousals are labeled as one of the three classical parasomnia arousal disorders.

Sleep Deprivation

sleep deprived

Getting the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep each night may seem like a long lost memory, let alone a luxury. But not getting enough sleep is known to have health consequences. Accumulating research suggests that sleep deprivation, even in the short term, could pave the way for anxiety, weight gain, insulin sensitivity, stroke and heart disease, memory impairment, hypertension and, well, you get the picture. Sleep deprivation is not okay.