Category Archives: Sleep Disorders

Snoring Solutions

snoring man

Medical Disclaimer: No claims are made for cures of any type within the following blog post. Check with your physician before following any regimen for snoring or any other medical issues you may be facing.

Almost everyone snores, including our pets. But if snoring is a frequent occurrence, it not only affects the quality and quantity of your own sleep, but that of your sleeping partner. Whether you snore yourself or your partner does, snoring can lead to a host of issues, including daytime fatigue, irritability, and just plain being cranky. Fortunately, sleeping in a separate bedroom isn’t the only antidote for snoring. There are several other effective snoring solutions worth a look.

Bed Wetting

wet bed

Bedwetting, or nocturnal enuresis in medical speak, is considered a natural part of a child’s development. The good news for parents is that it is not typically a sign of an underlying psychological, emotional, or medical problem. The other good news is that kids eventually grow out of it.

That doesn’t mean that it is any less stressful for parents or kids alike when it does happen. Children are embarrassed about it, particularly when they plan to have a sleepover at a friend’s house or go away to camp. Parents too often feel like there is nothing they can do to stop it. Thankfully, though, with some reassurance, emotional support, understanding, and some simple solutions for bed wetting you can help your child get through these trying episodes.

Sleep Paralysis

sleep paralysis

Sleep paralysis sounds like something only seen in a horror flick. You awake from a sound sleep, only to feel like you can’t move. You attempt to  move your arms, legs, and even your head, but find that you are frozen in your position. As the paralysis continues, sheer panic overcomes you. Then, as soon as it comes on, it’s over, leaving you wondering what just happened. While this experience may seem unbelievable, indeed it is a real occurrence.

And it’s more common than you might think. According to WebMD, as many as one in four of us may experience this phenomenon at one point or another.

Cures for Insomnia

insomniac

Medical Disclaimer: No claims are made for cures of any type within the following blog post. Check with your physician before following any regimen for insomnia or any other medical issues you may be facing.

Everyone has a night or two of having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. However, when it becomes a persistent case of insomnia, it can impact your quality of life, as it takes a toll on your mood, energy, and ability to get through your day. Adequate sleep is a primary part of a healthy lifestyle, and chronic insufficient sleep can lead to compromised health. That’s exactly why it’s important to look into cures for insomnia before the condition goes on too long.

Sleep Addiction

sleeping on couch

Sleep is one of the things in life that most people feel they can never have too much of. Part of the reason you feel this way is that failing to get enough sleep affects almost every other aspect of your day. Simple things like mood and complex things such as fine motor skills are greatly diminished by a lack of sleep. But, how much sleep does your body really need and is it possible to become addicted to sleep?

Sleepless in Seattle: How to Sleep When You’re Lovesick

 

lovesick

While there are all manners of cartoons and feature films (like the Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan hit Sleepless in Seattle) dedicated to the chaos Cupid’s arrow leaves in its wake when it strays off mark, in all seriousness, lovesickness can be a trying condition for the people who find themselves in its throes. Lovesickness, despite thoughts to the contrary, is not all in your head.

While it may seem like a romantic concept in the eyes of some, there are actual physical symptoms associated with this condition, in addition to the mental symptoms that are more commonly associated with it. Most people will suffer from some form of lovesickness in their lifetime—to a varying degree.

How to Sleep When You Are Worried

 

worried in bed

People try many things to fall asleep when worries weigh heavily upon their minds. Some people count sheep. Bing Crosby counted his blessings. But there are other things you can do, which are much more conducive to sleeping—even when you’re worried—than counting. If you’re having a hard time sleeping at night because the worries of the world are keeping you up, perhaps it’s time to try out these great tips.

Sleeping with Socks On

socks on in bed

One of the most important things you need in order to properly function and have good physical and mental health, is an adequate amount of “good sleep” each night. And, as crazy as it might sound to some, sleeping with socks on can make a surprising difference in the quality and quantity of sleep you get at night. But, why can it make so much of a difference, and is it the right move for you to make?

Why Wear Socks While Sleeping?

According to Dr. Oz, turning down the thermostat in your home and sleeping with socks on is a great way to trick your body. What happens is your body believes it’s hot, which forces a reduction in your core temperature. The end result is that because your body believes it is cooler, you are better able to fall asleep and remain asleep.

Night Terrors in Adults

man in bed afraid

Most people are surprised to learn night terrors — or often called sleep terrors — impact a surprising number of adults. While the condition is most commonly associated with children between the ages of three and twelve, it is also known to affect adults. The exact causes of night terrors are relatively unknown, though adults that experience them often find that there is a genetic predisposition to do so. Sometimes they are attributed to post traumatic stress — especially when night terrors impact soldiers coming home from war and victims of violence. According to the Mayo Clinic, most night terrors in children will cease by the time the child is in his or her adolescence.

Night Terrors in Children

little girl in bed

Has your child ever had an episode during sleep that included intense crying, kicking, thrashing, sweating, breathing quickly, rapidly beating heart rate, screaming loudly, getting out of bed and running throughout the house, being difficult to waken, or experiencing a profound fear? If so, your child probably had a night terror, also referred to as a sleep terror.

Who Experiences Night Terrors?

Up to 6 percent of children have a night terror at one time or another, according to WebMD. Children between the ages of three to 12 years are the most likely to get them. Although night terrors in adults are also an undesired sleep disorder, they occur in a far less percentage in adults than children. Fortunately, most children outgrow their night terrors by the time they reach their teens.  If you’re a parent of a child who has night terrors, you should know that in most cases, night terrors in children aren’t a cause for a concern, albeit scary to witness.