Tag Archives: Sleep Studies

Survey Results: Couples Who Sleep Closer Together are Happier

The closer you sleep to your significant other, the closer you are as a couple. At least this is the case according to a number of studies, including a recent sleep study from the University of Hertfordshire. The Edinburgh International Science Festival conducted a survey that discovered partners who sleep further than 30 inches apart weren’t as happy in their relationships as those who slept much closer.

What is the Caffeine Nap?

Taking a micro nap shortly after having a cup of coffee might seem like the worst possible way to become better rested, but recent studies beg to differ. In fact, a study performed by scientists at Loughborough University in the UK found that this technique, also called a caffeine nap, has excellent benefits. The caffeine nap helped drivers be more alert, have better performance, and even reduce the occurrence of the infamous afternoon crash.

Study Finds Drinking Tart Cherry Juice Helps Adults with Insomnia Sleep Better

We recently reported about a study touting kiwi as a possible natural sleep enhancer. Now, a recent study conducted by researchers at Louisiana State University indicates that a ritual of drinking tart cherry juice in the morning and at night can help you sleep better throughout the night.

New Findings on Caffeine and Sleep

It’s pretty much a common sense rule that many of us know all too well: don’t drink caffeine late in the day, or the evening for that matter, or be faced with difficulty falling asleep.

The Link Between Sleep Quality and Conflict in Relationships

We all know that going without sleep for one night can lead to crabbiness and overall discontent in the morning. The ill will and bad moods are gifts that keep on giving when it comes to conflict resolution and romantic entanglements. At least, this is the case according to a recent University of California Berkeley study.

A Look at the Increased Use of Sleeping Pills

In National Use of Prescription Medications for Insomnia, appearing in Volume 37, Issue 02 of the journal SLEEP, Harvard Medical School reports that approximately 3.5 percent (nearly six million) U.S. adults admitted to the use of sleeping pills within a one-month period of time. The study, conducted for the years 2009 and 2010, showed an increase over a similar study conducted in 1999-2000 which reported only 2 percent of adults.

New Mattress Purchase High on Baby Boomers Wish List

BedTimes Online Magazine reports that in 2008 the Better Sleep Council conducted a poll of Baby Boomers (adults born between 1946 and 1964) discovering that Baby Boomers had something pretty big in common. They all have new mattresses placed high on their “want” lists.

Study Says: A New Mattress Can Reduce Stress

The study, Back Pain, Sleep Quality, and Perceived Stress Following Introduction of New Bedding Systems, was conducted at Oklahoma State University and appeared in the Winter of 2009 Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. The study indicates that people experience less back pain and fewer stress symptoms when sleeping on a new mattress, noting that the best mattress for back pain is a new one.

Do You have a Side of the Bed Preference?

It looks like there’s a little bit of truth in the ages old saying about waking up on the wrong side of the bed. Premier Inn hotel chain recently conducted an interview involving 3,000 UK adults regarding their sleeping styles. Nearly 75 percent of those participating in the survey have no interest in switching sides. In fact, they feel that attempting to sleep on the other side would make them feel strange.

Does Sleeping in on the Weekend Make Up for Sleep Deprivation During the Work Week?

sleeping in

According to Harvard Medical School, most adults need seven to nine hours of sleep daily on average in order to experience optimal health and performance. Unfortunately, most people squeak through the workweek falling far short of the nightly sleep goals with plans to make that sleep up on the weekend. New evidence suggests that might not be as simple of a proposition as it was once believed to be.