Tag Archives: Sleep

Sleep Studies Part 2: Diet and Sleep

diet

Sleep Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine studied the dietary divergences among individuals with diverse sleep patterns. What they found in a diet and sleep study, as published in the journal Appetite, was striking.

Best Mattress for Heavy People

Foam Mattress for Heavy People

People who are heavy or overweight have a difficult time finding the right fit for many things. One thing that often surprises them is having difficulty with finding the best mattress for heavy people; one that meets their sleep needs.

Sleep Addiction

sleeping on couch

Sleep is one of the things in life that most people feel they can never have too much of. Part of the reason you feel this way is that failing to get enough sleep affects almost every other aspect of your day. Simple things like mood and complex things such as fine motor skills are greatly diminished by a lack of sleep. But, how much sleep does your body really need and is it possible to become addicted to sleep?

How to Sleep When You Are Worried

 

worried in bed

People try many things to fall asleep when worries weigh heavily upon their minds. Some people count sheep. Bing Crosby counted his blessings. But there are other things you can do, which are much more conducive to sleeping—even when you’re worried—than counting. If you’re having a hard time sleeping at night because the worries of the world are keeping you up, perhaps it’s time to try out these great tips.

Sleeping Off a Hangover

sleeping with a hangover

People suffering from the ill effects of a hangover are often easy to spot. They’re the ones wearing sunglasses inside, moving at a snail’s pace, and wincing at whispers as though they were steel drums being beaten with hammers a mere two inches from their sensitive ears. If you’re one of these hangover sufferers, there’s only one thing on your mind at the moment. You want relief. And the faster the better.

Sleeping After Back Surgery

back surgery

Having difficulty sleeping after back surgery or spinal surgery, like lumbar spine surgery, discectomy, disc replacement, laminectomy, or spinal fusion is completely normal. Your body has been through trauma as a result of surgery. Additionally, you may be dealing with pain, a sore incision, and simply not being able to get comfortable in order to sleep. However, getting enough sleep, particular uninterrupted continuous sleep, can help your body heal faster, getting you back to your normal routine faster. That said, here are a few tips, as given by medical experts, to help with your sleeping after back surgery.

Sleeping After Shoulder Surgery

shoulder surgery

Particularly after major surgery, sleep disturbances are commonplace. And having trouble sleeping after shoulder surgery is no different. According to the British Journal of Anaesthesia, the body goes through a metabolic and hormonal response to the trauma of surgery referred to as the “surgical stress response”.  This response, along with other post-surgery side effects such as pain, fever, sore incision, anesthesia, insomnia, and medications, can disrupt both the quality and quantity of sleep a person receives after shoulder surgery.

How Prescription Drugs Affect Sleep

prescription drugs

The US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health report, Effects of Drugs on Sleep, states that: “Chronic use or abuse of certain drugs may lead to the development of substance-related sleep disorders. Primary sleep disorders, such as apnea, periodic movement disorders, and parasomnias, may be exacerbated by various drugs.”

According to a Harvard Report on how External Factors Influence Sleep, the impact of prescription medications on sleep varies from one type to the next. For instance, beta blockers, which are commonly used to reduce blood pressure, cause decreased slow-wave sleep and in important REM sleep, while increasing sleepiness during the daytime hours. Alpha blockers, also used to reduce blood pressure and to treat some prostate conditions, also lead to decreases in REM sleep as well as boosts to daytime sleepiness. Some antidepressants, known as SSRIs, are believed to actually promote insomnia. The long-term impact of other antidepressant drugs on sleep are, as of yet, unknown.

Sleep and Aging

elderly woman sleeping

Just as our hair will likely turn grey and wrinkles will probably adorn our faces, as we age many of us can expect to encounter sleep changes.

These sleep and aging changes can result in waking up throughout the night, becoming sleepy earlier, and awakening earlier than we used to.

Sleep and Aging Statistics

As many as 50 percent of seniors experience some sort of sleep disturbance as they embark on their golden years.  And according to the National Institute of Aging, a good number of seniors are not getting enough sleep. One of the reasons that many seniors are sleep deprived is in their trouble in falling asleep. More than a third of women and 13 percent of men reported taking more than an half an hour (30 minutes) to fall asleep (sleep latency), according to a study the institute cited.

Night Terrors in Children

little girl in bed

Has your child ever had an episode during sleep that included intense crying, kicking, thrashing, sweating, breathing quickly, rapidly beating heart rate, screaming loudly, getting out of bed and running throughout the house, being difficult to waken, or experiencing a profound fear? If so, your child probably had a night terror, also referred to as a sleep terror.

Who Experiences Night Terrors?

Up to 6 percent of children have a night terror at one time or another, according to WebMD. Children between the ages of three to 12 years are the most likely to get them. Although night terrors in adults are also an undesired sleep disorder, they occur in a far less percentage in adults than children. Fortunately, most children outgrow their night terrors by the time they reach their teens.  If you’re a parent of a child who has night terrors, you should know that in most cases, night terrors in children aren’t a cause for a concern, albeit scary to witness.